The Public Ineffectual

"The Medium is the Message" or: tumblr is a horrible place to have effective intellectual discussions but damn it i'm bored and don't want to write this dissertation right now

5,974 notes

The first time he calls you holy,
you laugh it back so hard your sides hurt.
The second time,
you moan gospel around his fingers
between your teeth.
He has always surprised
you into surprising yourself.
Because he’s an angel hiding his halo
behind his back and
nothing has ever felt so filthy
as plucking the wings from his shoulders—
undressing his softness
one feather at a time.
God, if you’re out there,
if you’re listening,
he fucks like a seraphim,
and there’s no part of scripture
that ever prepared you for his hands.
Hands that map a communion
in the cradle of your hips.
Hands that kiss hymns up your sides.
He confesses how long he’s looked
for a place to worship and,
oh,
you put him on his knees.
When he sinks to the floor and moans
like he can’t help himself,
you wonder if the other angels
fell so sweet.
He says his prayers between your thighs
and you dig your heels into the base of his spine
until he blushes the color of your filthy tongue.
You will ruin him and he will thank you;
he will say please.
No damnation ever looked as cozy as this,
but you fit over his hips like they
were made for you.
You fit, you fit, you fit.
On top of him, you are an ancient god
that only he remembers and he
offers up his skin.
And you take it.
Who knew sacrifice was so profane?
And once you’ve taught him how to hold
your throat in one hand
and your heart in the other,
you will have forgotten every other word,
except his name.
PROFANE, by Ashe Vernon (via 5000letters)

(via disturbuniverse)

65,665 notes

naotakunn:

i cant believe this. i cant fucking believe this. i meant to send this to my boyfriend but instead i sent it to my boss right after i told her i was quitting all i wanted to do was make an inappropriate cookie joke but no i got mixed up texting two people at once and literally sent a picture of a chocolate chip cookie captioned “ooh she thique” to the fifty year old suburban mother of two of whom i have nothing but a strictly professional relationship with. after knowing me for almost a year and a half as a hard working and respectable employee this is the last thing i will ever say to her i can never go back to that shop again all because of this god damn cookie blunder What have i Done

naotakunn:

i cant believe this. i cant fucking believe this. i meant to send this to my boyfriend but instead i sent it to my boss right after i told her i was quitting all i wanted to do was make an inappropriate cookie joke but no i got mixed up texting two people at once and literally sent a picture of a chocolate chip cookie captioned “ooh she thique” to the fifty year old suburban mother of two of whom i have nothing but a strictly professional relationship with. after knowing me for almost a year and a half as a hard working and respectable employee this is the last thing i will ever say to her i can never go back to that shop again all because of this god damn cookie blunder What have i Done

(via spookingofskelesackia)

1,276 notes

joulesburn:

vicemag:

Does Someone Have to Die Before Gamer Gate Ends?
Brianna Wu is a developer and writer who’s penned pieces on the gender imbalance in modern video games and the harassment women in the industry continue to deal with as part of their daily business. She heads up the small studio Giant Spacekat, makers of Revolution 60, a mobile game hailed as “a most triumphant and excellent adventure” by RPGfan.com and denounced as “a bland, uninteresting, feminism circle-jerk” by Metacritic user Realgamer101. I’m guessing that’s not his real name, but there’s no guesswork required to figure out the poster’s gender.
On October 11, Wu tweeted the above screenshot—a series of threatening messages she’d received from a Twitter account that’s since been suspended. 
Before we go any further, it’s important to ask whether or not you want to read anything more on GamerGate. Since you’re on this page, chances are you’re aware of the sides in this bizarre online kerfuffle, as well as the problem with giving GamerGate any further coverage: These words may be further fuel for a fire that needs to die down before anyone can properly discuss the more pertinent points raised by a still-evolving debate.
If that means nothing to you, here’s a summary: A (formerly) low-profile indie developer named Zoe Quinn created and released a game called Depression Quest. Some people argued that it wasn’t a game at all—but that’s not the controversy. An ex of Quinn’s published information in August of 2014 implying that she had slept around to secure positive review coverage forDepression Quest. There’s no evidence connecting any alleged promiscuity—which, in any case, is nobody’s business apart from those doing the screwing, anyway—with the reception Depression Quest received, but the conversation quickly turned to ethics: As in, some game journalists were seen to be favorable toward certain projects that they were incredibly tenuously linked to. That connection could be chipping into a Kickstarter pot, or having long ago worked on a collaborative venture together. You get the idea: Person A once spoke to Person B, and for that reason Person A’s recommendation of Person B’s new Game C is clearly completely corrupt.
Continue

I don’t think I ever really believed the whole ‘boys hating girls’ gamer shtick until GG.  But goddamn.  These gamer comments are as misogynistic as Fox News comments are racist.  

joulesburn:

vicemag:

Does Someone Have to Die Before Gamer Gate Ends?

Brianna Wu is a developer and writer who’s penned pieces on the gender imbalance in modern video games and the harassment women in the industry continue to deal with as part of their daily business. She heads up the small studio Giant Spacekat, makers of Revolution 60, a mobile game hailed as “a most triumphant and excellent adventure” by RPGfan.com and denounced as “a bland, uninteresting, feminism circle-jerk” by Metacritic user Realgamer101. I’m guessing that’s not his real name, but there’s no guesswork required to figure out the poster’s gender.

On October 11, Wu tweeted the above screenshot—a series of threatening messages she’d received from a Twitter account that’s since been suspended. 

Before we go any further, it’s important to ask whether or not you want to read anything more on GamerGate. Since you’re on this page, chances are you’re aware of the sides in this bizarre online kerfuffle, as well as the problem with giving GamerGate any further coverage: These words may be further fuel for a fire that needs to die down before anyone can properly discuss the more pertinent points raised by a still-evolving debate.

If that means nothing to you, here’s a summary: A (formerly) low-profile indie developer named Zoe Quinn created and released a game called Depression Quest. Some people argued that it wasn’t a game at all—but that’s not the controversy. An ex of Quinn’s published information in August of 2014 implying that she had slept around to secure positive review coverage forDepression Quest. There’s no evidence connecting any alleged promiscuity—which, in any case, is nobody’s business apart from those doing the screwing, anyway—with the reception Depression Quest received, but the conversation quickly turned to ethics: As in, some game journalists were seen to be favorable toward certain projects that they were incredibly tenuously linked to. That connection could be chipping into a Kickstarter pot, or having long ago worked on a collaborative venture together. You get the idea: Person A once spoke to Person B, and for that reason Person A’s recommendation of Person B’s new Game C is clearly completely corrupt.

Continue

I don’t think I ever really believed the whole ‘boys hating girls’ gamer shtick until GG.  But goddamn.  These gamer comments are as misogynistic as Fox News comments are racist.  

(via liobits)

36 notes

djapavlak:

historicalfirearms:

Sons of Empire

Above are various reproductions of the English military artist Harry Payne’s painting ‘Sons of Empire’, originally painted in December 1899. The first image is a reproduction of the original painting, printed in Munich in 1900, for London postcard publishers Raphael Tuck & Sons Ltd. in aid of the Transvaal War Fund for Widows and Orphans.  The painting was reproduced as a colour photogravure - a process which involves light sensitive gelatin on copper and etching to produce a high quality, detailed print.  The original run of prints was dedicated to the then Commander in Chief of the British Army, Field Marshal Garnet Wolseley

The painting itself shows over twenty branches of the British and Imperial military forces, a key to the picture (see image #4) was also produced.  The key notes that there are men from across the Empire including Britain, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand, Rhodesia, Natal and Tasmania.  As well as elements from the Royal Navy and Royal Marines.  
In the far background of the painting we can see elements of a Royal Navy shore party manning a gun while the Royal Engineers dig a trench while on the right two horsemen of the Natal Mounted Infantry and the Imperial Light Horse approach.  The foreground is packed with over a dozen men from British, Highland and Commonwealth units.  Including a Grenadier Guards officer holding a Union Jack flag in front of him are men of the Canadian Infantry, the Gordon Highlanders, the Royal Navy and the West Perth Infantry.  Many of the men in khaki originate from South African units of mounted infantry while the British line regiments appear in their scarlet tunics which would not be officially abandoned until Khaki Service Dress was introduced in 1902.  However, even before 1902, the units in the field during the Boer War wore sand coloured field dress much as the African Mounted Infantry did.

Patriotic prints and postcards were a popular way of raising money at the turn of the century. Image #1 and #2 are prime examples of this, with the print and postcards produced to support the Transvaal War Fund for Widows and Orphans was set up in 1899, as a fund for the wives and children of British and Commonwealth soldiers who had been killed during the Second Boer War

The January 2nd 1900, edition of the South Australian Register reported that Raphael Tuck & Sons Ltd. were to donate the profit of the first year of the photogravure’s profits to the Transvaal Fund.  Additionally Payne’s original painting, also owned by Tuck & Sons was to be auctioned by the company with a starting price of 100 Guineas (roughly £35,000 in modern currency).  

Image #2 shows a sepia postcard which was sold at the same time as the photogravure also in aid of the Transvaal Fund.  The simplified postcard was cataloged as ‘Empire’ postcard no.1282 by Tuck & Sons and was printed between 1900 and at least 1902.  The example in Image #2 was mailed from Haywards Heath, Sussex on 29th March 1902.

Interestingly ‘Sons of Empire’ was again printed during the First World War, this time in aid of the National Relief Fund - a charity which sought to help families of serving men and those suffering “industrial distress” as a result of the war.  This second colour printing renamed Payne’s painting ‘Defenders of the Empire 1914-15’ and made some subtle changes to the original.  Replacing some of the men with troops from India featuring prominently on the right of the group.  The sailors manning a gun in the original and the Royal Engineers in the background have been removed but replaced with a rather more impressive vista.  Gone are the foothills of the original, in their place is a seascape with ships and aircraft of the Royal Navy.  The aircraft in particular are a remarkably recent addition to the British Empire’s armoury. 

Harry Payne was a prolific military artist producing dozens of paintings focusing on the British Edwardian Army with many commissioned by Raphael Tuck & Sons.  Tuck & Sons was originally founded in the late 1860s as a framing and picture selling shop but they grew rapidly during the 1870s and 1880s selling photographs, greetings cards and postcards that became extremely popular in the 1890s they were granted a Royal Warrant of Appointment by Queen Victoria.  They continued to trade into the late 1950s when they combined with other printing companies.  

The patriotic postcards of the Second Boer War and the First World War became extremely popular with troops departing for France and while they were on the Western Front.  The traditional postcards were quickly supplemented by photo-postcards which used photographs of the front, France and the troops themselves. 

Sources:

Image One Source

Image Two & Three Source

Image Four Source

'1914-1918: How charities helped to win WW1' (source)

'Sons of Empire', South Australian Register (Adelaide, 2nd January 1900) (source)

I’m an American and even I want a print of this.

(via spookingofskelesackia)

177,635 notes

beyonslayed:

cheesecakefagtory:

Video of the century.

MISS THANG IS SERV- ING THE GIRLS

(Source: kristenwiiggle, via ruinedchildhood)